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6 followed by 6

“6 followed by 6” is a system that exists on 2 strings & enables you to see 10 frets at a glance. The 1st & 2nd, the 3rd & 4th, the 4th & 5th and the 5th & 6th strings all have a common relationship between the notes that are located on them. The 2nd & 3rd strings have their own sequential relationship, due to the one fret adjustment, so they are not part of this concept.

6 followed by 6.png

The Major root is on the 1st or higher pitched string, but you begin on the 2nd or lower pitched string to set up the pattern. In the key of “G” Major, the frets for the “#1 group of 6” are: 3, 5 & 7. So, using down & up strokes, play 3, 5, 7 on the 2nd string & then 3, 5, 7 on the 1st string. You just played your 1st "#1 group of 6". Repeat a few times to get comfortable with the sequence.

Frets for the “#2 group of 6” are: 8, 10 & 12. Again using down & up strokes, play 8, 10, 12 on the 2nd string & then 8, 10, 12 on the 1st string. You just played your 1st "#2 group of 6". Repeat a few times to get comfortable.

 

Next play a "#1 group of 6" & immediately go to the "#2 group of 6". Do this sequence several times.

 
Be aware of the centering point, the 7th & 8th frets, where the 2 “groups of 6” butt up against each other but do not overlap.

 

Also notice the pentatonic “2 & 3” in the #1 group and the pentatonic “3 & 2” in the #2 group. Point to remember: a "2 & 3" is always followed by a "3 & 2".

 

The green squares are the extra notes you can use to spice things up a bit.

 

For the sake of this study we are focusing on the G Major root, shown as the big red dot.. However, it is good to be aware that if you shift your attention to the big triangle, the relative E minor notes are under your fingers.

6 followed by 6.png

After you are comfortable with the concept of “6 followed by 6”, here is an exercise for you. ( Before you start, notice in addition to the official 2 “groups of 6”, there are 2 more groupings in the middle over frets 5, 7 & 8 and frets 7, 8 & 10. )

playing through

“Playing through” starts with playing the “#1 group of 6”. Start on the 2nd string & play frets 3, 5 & 7 ( I suggest using your Index, Middle & Pinky ). Then play frets 3, 5, & 7 on the 1st. You have now played the "#1 group of 6".

 
Using your Index, Ring & Pinky fingers, start again on the 2nd string & play frets 5, 7 & 8, then play frets 5, 7 & 8 on the 1st string. Consider this a 2nd grouping of notes.


Using your Index, Middle & Pinky fingers, start again on the 2nd string & play frets 7, 8 & 10, then play frets 7, 8 & 10 on the 1st string. Consider this a 3rd grouping of notes.

 

Once more, using your Index, Middle & Pinky fingers, start on the 2nd string & play frets 8, 10 & 12. Then play frets 8, 10 & 12 on the 1st string. You just played the official “#2 group of 6”.


Since this exercise offers different finger combinations, pay attention to the way you set up each sequence. Once you are comfortable with the forward process, start on the 1st string at the 12th fret with your Pinky & work your way backwards. The backward sequences would be over frets 12, 10 & 8, then frets 10, 8 & 7, then frets 8, 7 & 5, finishing with frets 7, 5 & 3.

 

As you do any of these exercises, "playing through" is a good practice to develop. 

numeric values for 6 followed by 6

Another viewpoint or way of referencing the concept of “6 followed by 6” is thinking of the numeric relationship that exists in both of the groups. 
The “#1 group of 6”, starting on the 2nd string is: 5, 6, 7, 1, 2, 3. 
The “#2 group of 6”, starting on the 2nd string is: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. 

6 by 6 numeric.png

Here are a few more exercises, using the numeric approach, combined with the fingering setups from “playing through” as part of your process. 

try triangles

As you look at the groups of 6 there are many geometric designs you can find. Our next exercise uses triangles or a set of notes that have a point & a base.


Looking at the "#1 group of 6", find the triangle that uses the numbers 6 1 3. Play them as a triplet with the count being 123, 123, 123 not 1234. You have just played your 1st triangle.

 
The next 3 numeric triangle sequences would be: 7 2 4, then 1 3 5, then 2 4 6.


Try inverting the triangles with this sequence:  6 1 3 then 2 7 5. Complete the inverting part of the exercise by “playing through” all the setup points.


How about a series of smaller triangles: 5 1 2, then 6 2 3, then 7 3 4 & so on.

How about a triangle that keeps growing: 5 1 2, then 5 1 3 , then 5 1 4. 

6 by 6 numeric.png

power chords

As you look at the "#1 group of 6" find the numeric 5 2 combination. Press on both notes & play with a single stroke to make a power chord of sorts. The other power chords as you play through numerically would be: 6 3, then 1 5, then 2 6. You can use the 7 4 numeric combination, though it’s not a typical power chord shape.

 

Try inverting the shapes by staying on the same frets and switching strings 
with your fingers. Numeric sequences 5 2 becomes 6 1. Continue by “playing through” all the fingering setups. 

6 by 6 numeric.png

pivot point or anchor note

The idea is to keep going back to the 1st or starting note of the phrase, in between playing the other notes, in any of the groupings. Starting at the high end of the "#2 group of 6", place your Pinky on the 12th fret of the 1st string. Here is your numeric sequence: 6 5, then 6 4, then 6 3, then 6 2, then 6 1. On the 6 3 combination I would suggest using your Pinky to play the 6 & your Ring finger to play the 3 so your Pinky can focus on the 6. Finish by once again “playing through” all the setup points. 

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